Quebec city inaugurates new nanofiltration water treatment system

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QUEBEC CITY, June 14, 2001 — The mayor of Sainte-Genevi�-de-Batiscan, Andr�agny, and the Chairman and CEO of H2O Innovation (2000) Inc., Guy Goulet, inaugurated the municipality's new water treatment system today in the presence of government, corporate, business, and environmental representatives.

Magny noted that the inauguration of the membrane-based nanofiltration system, the culmination of three years of efforts, will definitively resolve a 50-year-old problem the municipality has had with brackish, extremely hard groundwater.

Developed by "Darv-Eau Inc.", a subsidiary of "H2O Innovation", the new system, which serves 1,125 residents and treats 120,000 imperial gallons of drinking water a day, is the safest technology available, according to Magny.

The capacity of the membrane filtration system can easily be increased to over 144,000 imperial gallons per day to meet changing needs as the municipality grows. Guy Goulet stressed that providing surface and groundwater treatment systems for municipalities represents a strategic choice for "H2O Innovation".

He affirmed that Sainte-Genevi�-de-Batiscan's decision to opt for a membrane- based filtration system will provide residents with a quality drinking water supply that meets and even exceeds new government standards.

Quebec City consulting firm "BPR" planned and designed the project, which was financed by the municipality with the support of the Quebec government. "H2O Innovation" specializes in surface and groundwater treatment, seawater desalinization and water demineralization for industrial processes, and industrial wastewater treatment systems.

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