Councilwoman's chief of staff addresses city African-American engineers and architects

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LOS ANGELES, October 31, 2002 -- Daryl Sweeney, Chief of Staff to Los Angeles Councilwoman Jan Perry, Ninth Council District, second from left, joins officers of the City of Los Angeles African-American Engineers and Architects Association (AAEAA).

From left, they are Roddye Davis, Vice President of the Department of Public Works Bureau of Sanitation; Hyginus O. Mmeje, President, also of the Bureau of Sanitation; and Rosa Brice, Secretary of the Bureau of Engineering; and (not pictured) Bellete Yohannes, Treasurer, of the Bureau of Sanitation.

Sweeney recently spoke on behalf of the Councilwoman to AAEAA members about her vision for the district and the City and how the organization can contribute. AAEAA's mission is to serve as a resource for quality City services, encourage and provide professional development to its members, and attract a quality workforce to the City. (Photo courtesy Richard Lee)

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