Ionics' Okla. installation inaugurates third generation EDR technology

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CLINTON, OK, April 28, 2005 -- GE Infrastructure Water & Process Technologies (W&PT), a unit of General Electric Company, held a dedication ceremony recognizing Ionics Inc.'s third generation EDR system, which is producing 4.5 mgd of drinking water for area residents of Oklahoma's Foss Reservoir.

The area's topography is highlighted by its inclusion in the Washita National Wildlife Refuge.

This new system -- based on the principle of electrodialysis reversal (EDR) -- was installed to produce potable water from high calcium brackish surface water. This event was held at the Charles E. Engleman Water Treatment Plant on April 28.

Brief remarks on the project were given by:
-- Foss Conservancy District president David Berrong
-- Brent Kissling, state director of USDA Rural Development.
-- Larry Walkoviak, manager of the Oklahoma and Texas area office of the Bureau of Reclamation.
-- Brian Hermon, with Ionics (now owned by GE W&PT)
-- Clinton Mayor Lynn Norman, and
-- David Thompson, representing Congressman Frank Lucas, who was to deliver the dedication address.

Work on the major upgrade of the plant began in October 2002. With the upgrade essentially done capacity has been increased from 2.8 million gallons a day. A maximum production test of the plant was conducted on April 4.

The third generation EDR system was installed to meet the surrounding area's increasing potable water needs and allow the Foss Reservoir Master Conservancy District to reduce operating and maintenance costs. The improved EDR technology at Foss Reservoir provides a cost effective solution, higher quality of drinking water and a smaller footprint.

The Foss Reservoir water treatment plant has operated successfully for the last 31 years, having relied on electrodialysis technology from Ionics Inc. EDR has since become a time-proven membrane process for desalinating water and there are over 1,500 EDR-based water desalination systems in operation in both the United States and throughout the world.

GE Water & Process Technologies (www.gewater.com), a unit of GE Infrastructure, is a leading global supplier of water, wastewater and process systems solutions. W&PT delivers customer value by improving performance and product quality and by reducing operating costs and extending equipment life in a broad range of products and services. These products and services are used to optimize total water/process system performance, safeguard customer assets from corrosion, fouling and scaling, and protect the environment through water and energy conservation.

Some information for this report was drawn from the Clinton Daily News.

Photo copyright Wildsteps.com Inc. (2002: Washita National Wildlife Refuge)

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