ABB speakers join other specialists for PPC seminar

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July 19, 2007 -- ABB hosted and supported a recent high-level seminar on Regulatory affairs -- monitoring of wastewater discharges under PPC. ABB fielded two speakers in the line-up, which also included specialist suppliers, regulators and certification bodies. The packed seminar was chaired by John Tipping of the Environment Agency.

ABB's Tony Hoyle discussed the Environment Agency's Monitoring Certification Scheme (MCERTS) with particular relevance to flow measurement and verification, while Matt Bardell from ABB's engineering services spoke about the requirements for aqueous monitoring under PPC and the use of Best Available Techniques to achieve it.

MCERTS aims to ensure accurate discharge monitoring as the Environment Agency moves towards a situation where potential polluters are increasingly required to monitor their own activities. MagMaster magnetic flow meters from ABB are currently in the process of receiving MCERTS approval, while the company's meter verification system, CalMaster2, is being prepared for submission to the regulator's chosen certification body, SIRA.

All the presentations from the workshop are now available on the Sensors for Water Interest Group's (SWIG) website. The information will be useful to anyone in the process sector or water industry who is trying to get to grips with the regulatory regime recently introduced by the Pollution Prevention and Control (PPC) regulations.

PPC, MCERTS inspection and approval has already generated considerable activity in the water industry and is starting to generate activity in the Process Sector where potential polluters' have submitted PPC permit applications and now need to demonstrate compliance. SWIG is planning to hold a further Midlands based seminar on the regulations early next year.

ABB is a leader in power and automation technologies that enable utility and industry customers to improve performance while lowering environmental impact. The ABB Group of companies operates in around 100 countries and employs about 109,000 people.

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