Overview of legal, policy framework for treatment plant security released

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ALEXANDRIA, VA, Jan. 28, 2008 -- The Water Environment Federation (WEF), in partnership with the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA), the American Public Works Association (APWA), and the Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies (AMWA) has released, "Protecting the Water Sector from Security Threats", a new publication that provides an overview of the legal and policy framework that governs key aspects of security at drinking water and wastewater treatment facilities in the United States.

Developed as an update of NACWA's 2002 publication, "Protecting Water Infrastructure Assets... Legal Issues in a Time of Crisis Checklist", this new publication utilizes the expertise of WEF, NACWA, APWA and AMWA to expand, revise, and update the issues covered in the original document in response to unprecedented legal, technical, and policy changes in protecting the nation's critical water sector infrastructure since the events of September 11, 2001. Intended for water and wastewater utility executives, managers, and operators, the publication covers the most common legal considerations when implementing a security and emergency response program in utilities and public works facilities.

"WEF is pleased to partner with these prestigious organizations in updating this publication," said WEF Executive Director Bill Bertera. "The legal aspects of water security are constantly evolving and WEF and our partner organizations hope water and wastewater utility executives, managers, and operators will find this publication helpful as they continue to provide clean and safe water to the nation under increasingly challenging circumstances."

Each organization provided two water sector utility representatives and a staff representative to guide the work of the LeBouef Law Firm to draft the publication. Key aspects covered in the publication include the duty of utilities to the public and employees regarding preparing for and responding to terrorist and man-made disasters; considerations for employee background checks; and properly balancing the public's right to know with keeping certain vital information confidential.

Provided at no-charge to WEF members and water sector utilities, WEF members can download the document from the WEF Web site: www.wef.org. Water sector utilities may request a hard copy by contacting svaughn@wef.org.

For non-members and non water sector utility representatives, the document can be purchased in WEF's online Marketplace at www.wef.org/Marketplace.


Formed in 1928, the Water Environment Federation (WEF) is a not-for-profit technical and educational organization with more than 33,000 individual members and 81 affiliated Member Associations representing an additional 50,000 water quality professionals throughout the world.

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