Report finds increasing application of submersible pumps in water, wastewater

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DUBLIN, Ireland, July 30, 2008 -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of Frost & Sullivan's new report "North American Submersible Pump Markets" to their offering.

Municipal water and wastewater applications are helping sustain the growth of the North American submersible pumps market. The municipal wastewater treatment sector has been witnessing tremendous growth and as the population continues to grow, the need to develop more treatment facilities is only likely to increase. Environmental regulations are also expected to drive the market for wastewater treatment equipment, thereby the submersible pumps market. The new Nutrient Criteria Regulations as well as the proposed Combined Animal Feed Operations rules are two examples of the ways that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is influencing the growing wastewater treatment equipment market.

However, the U.S. submersible pumps market, which is the largest revenue generator in the region, is saturated when it comes to demand for new pumping equipment. This, in turn, has forced manufacturers to concentrate on a service-oriented strategy in order to maintain market share. "Extensive competition within the market has led to a trend of consolidation, which is expected to evolve to a stage where manufacturers need to provide value-added services to sustain end-user loyalty," notes the analyst of this research service. "Consequently, pump manufacturers are increasingly having to offer service or annual maintenance contracts to end users."

Upgradation of Aging and Existing Treatment Plants and Piping Infrastructure Expected to Create Demand for New Equipment
The upgradation of old and existing treatment plants is expected to be a key factor in the demand for new submersible pumps. As a result of these upgradation activities, demand for equipment related to treatment plants is likely to increase significantly in 2008, despite the high prices. The replacement of old equipment in processing plants, such as in the chemicals industry, has also helped sustain the demand for submersible pumps in North America. While all these will ensure that the market grows at a higher rate in 2008, the difficulties faced in upgrades are also likely to increase as environmental regulations become more stringent.

Overall, the North American submersible pumps market generated revenues of $175.1 million in 2007 and is likely to witness marginal growth in the initial years of the forecast period. "As for end-user markets, the water and wastewater industry remains the largest, contributing 60.0 percent of the total pumps revenues in 2007," says the analyst. "The mining industry is the second largest end-user application and contributed 14.8 percent of the revenues in 2007."

For more information: http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/6f8b4a/north_american_sub.

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Also see: -- Report reveals strategies for winning water infrastructure battle

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