Ten new MIEX systems to start-up in 2008

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July 8, 2008 -- Momentum is continuing to build for the MIEX® Technology in the United States with 6 new systems starting up in the first half of 2008 and a total of 10 systems scheduled to startup by the end of 2008. The rapid increase in the number of MIEX® installations has been driven by utilities looking to come into compliance with the EPA's Stage 1 and 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rules. The MIEX® Process uses a magnetized ion exchange resin to remove natural organic matter from water supplies, a precursor to the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs).

"We are excited to see such rapid adoption of the process following the start-up of the first U.S. systems in early 2005" said Shane Jones, President of Orica Watercare Inc. "Also with significant increases in carbon prices in the past year, there has been even more interest in the MIEX® Process as a cost-effective alternative to carbon adsorption for DBP compliance." Orica Watercare Inc, is the manufacturer of MIEX® Resin and process equipment and is based in Denver Colorado.

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