> More information about EPA's storm water permitting program ###"> Idaho developer fined for failing to control runoff, violating federal Clean Water Act - WaterWorld

Idaho developer fined for failing to control runoff, violating federal Clean Water Act

Sponsored by

COEUR D'ALENE, ID, June 17, 2009 -- G.F. Barnes Construction Inc. will pay $12,900 for allegedly mismanaging runoff from their Granite Peaks condominium construction site near Sandpoint, Idaho. The alleged violations were observed by federal and state inspectors beginning in April 2005.

The settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) resolves the developer's alleged Clean Water Act violations that included discharging sediment from the construction site into a tributary of Schweitzer Creek and failing to obtain the proper permit under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System.

This permit requires operators of construction sites to conduct regular inspections and implement certain storm water controls in order to protect the nation's waterways from pollutants such as sediment, oil and grease, and concrete washout.

"While many builders and developers are doing the right thing by preventing runoff from their sites, there are some who are ignoring these important storm water requirements," said Jim Werntz, EPA's director of Idaho operations. "We take protecting Idaho waters very seriously. Builders and developers need to get the right permits and implement runoff controls before they start work or, like Barnes Construction, they will face fines."

According to EPA officials, Barnes Construction failed to plan and implement the necessary storm water controls.

Under the Clean Water Act, developers must create Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SWPPP) describing how construction storm water will be controlled at the site. Their plans must also show how their project will prevent sediment and other construction waste from being discharged into nearby streams, rivers or lakes.

>> More information about EPA's storm water permitting program

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

VIDEO: Desalination global news round-up

Join WWi Chief Editor Tom Freyberg for a round-up of the latest desalination industry news from the last two weeks. Watch the video for the full stories…

Maryland WWTP's new solar array to serve as state's largest municipally-owned system

Standard Solar is set to install a 2.1-megawatt ground-mount solar system in Pocomoke City, Md., at the city's wastewater treatment facility. Once completed this December, it will be the largest municipally-owned system in the state.

Major Texas company to pay $1.6M civil penalty for CWA oil spill violations

The Department of Justice and the EPA have announced that Superior Crude Gathering has agreed to pay a civil penalty for alleged violations of the Clean Water Act stemming from a crude oil spill in 2010 from tanks at the company's oil storage facility in the town of Ingleside, Texas.

Bureau of Reclamation makes WaterSMART grants available to improve water, energy conservation

The Bureau of Reclamation is inviting states, tribes, water and irrigation districts, and other water- and power-related organizations to apply for funding to cost-share on projects that conserve and use water more efficiently, increase renewable energy use and improve energy efficiency.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA