EPA launches Chesapeake Bay TMDL website

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PHILADELPHIA, PA, Aug. 21, 2009 -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's mid-Atlantic region today announced the launch of a website dedicated to the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) -- a major initiative to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay and local waters. The website allows the public to stay tuned to key developments, draft work products, schedules of public meetings and events, and have questions answered about the process.

The TMDL, essentially a "pollution diet," will define the needed reductions in the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus as well as sediments that are harming the Bay and local waters. The Bay TMDL will be backed by state-devised implementation plans and a series of measures to assure accountability in meeting cleanup commitments.

To access the site, visit http://www.epa.gov/chesapeakebaytmdl

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