District is unique in variety, uses of recycled wastewater

Sponsored by

EL SEGUNDO, CA, Sept. 16, 2009 -- West Basin Municipal Water District (West Basin) has developed one of the most unique water recycling systems in the world. West Basin makes five types of "designer" recycled waters that serve various needs from irrigation to refinery cooling towers, street cleaners to indirect drinking water.

West Basin's five "designer" recycled waters include ultrapure water for high pressure boiler feeds, purified water for low pressure boiler feeds, cooling tower water, irrigation water, and indirect potable drinking water for seawater barriers that protect coastal L.A. groundwater from saltwater contamination. Barrier water also replenishes groundwater wells. No other water agency in the world has such a unique and diverse array of sewer water for recycled water uses. Engineers, elected officials and others visit from around the world to learn about West Basin's sewer water recycling efforts that are creating new, much-needed water supplies.

West Basin launched its water recycling program in the mid-1990's following a statewide drought. To promote local water reliability, West Basin has invested more than $500 million dollars in this unique program. West Basin has also invested in an ocean-water desalination program that uses the same technology -- microfiltration and reverse osmosis.

The water recycling program provides environmental benefits in that 30 million (and eventually 70 million) gallons a day of sewer water and five tons of biosolids (eventually 10 tons) are no longer discharged each day into Santa Monica Bay. Each day, that amount of wastewater is redirected to West Basin's water recycling facility for treatment and reuse. The biosolids are recycled daily into landfill covers and roadbed fill. West Basin's solar panels contribute 10% of peak energy use for recycled water production.

West Basin's recycling program serves parks, golf courses, office buildings, and others, recently producing its 100 billionth gallon of recycled water, and works with more than 300 customers, from Chevron, Exxon-Mobil, bp, Toyota, and Honda, to the Home Depot Center, Marriott and others. 100 billion gallons is enough water for 2.5 million people for an entire year.

Recycled water production is part of West Basin's Water Reliability 2020 program to provide greater water reliability and help Metropolitan Water District of Southern California both meet Southern California's future water needs and ease some of the strain on Northern California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay Delta.

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

City of Lima, Ohio, enters CWA settlement to reduce critical sewage overflows

To resolve claims that untreated sewer discharges were released into the Ottawa River during wet weather, the city of Lima, Ohio, has entered into a Clean Water Act settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Justice and State of Ohio.

AWWA to Congress: Nutrient pollution reduction key to preventing cyanotoxins

In a testimony recently held before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy, American Water Works Association President John Donahue stressed that the solution to keeping drinking water safe from cyanotoxins begins with reducing nutrient pollution.

Reclamation invests $9.2M in water, power research in West amid drought

Following a year of record drought, water managers throughout the West are searching for information and ideas to ensure a reliable and sustainable water supply. To meet this growing need, the Bureau of Reclamation has officially awarded $9.2 million for 131 research projects.

City of Philadelphia names first 'Stormwater Pioneer'

The Philadelphia Water Department has named Stanley's True Value Hardware as the city's first Stormwater Pioneer. The store's third-generation owners were recognized as role models for small business owners and private developers looking to reduce stormwater runoff.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA