DoD selects Worrell Water system for beneficial water reuse project

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• Next Generation Living Machine® System will be part of comprehensive water planning for growth and sustainability at DoD facilities

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA, Nov. 12, 2009 -- Worrell Water Technologies today announced that the Living Machine® ecological wastewater treatment and recycling system was selected as a project under the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) to demonstrate and validate its use and benefits for on-site recycling of wastewater.

The ESTCP is a Department of Defense (DoD) program that promotes innovative, cost-effective environmental technologies through demonstration and validation at DoD sites. The project is in partnership with the Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, which will be in charge of overall project management.

The Living Machine® system enhances and accelerates the productive treatment process of a tidal wetland, collecting black water in a buried primary tank which is then pumped into a series of wetland basins. Utilizing proprietary technology, the wetland basins are alternately drained and filled in a manner analogous to natural tidal wetlands providing oxygen and nutrients for microorganisms which live in the wetland and naturally treat the wastewater. Treated water may then be recycled for purposes such as landscape irrigation, toilet flushing, industrial processes, washing equipment or animal areas, landscape water features (e.g. fish ponds, waterfalls) and other uses.

The anticipated benefit of using an ecological wastewater treatment system is a total reduction in potable, non-drinking, water use, which translates into cost and water savings, helping military facilities provide the training and support that are at the core of the DoD mission.

Additional benefits of on-site water reclamation and reuse include:

-- Contributes to a more consistent and reliable water supply;
-- Reduces discharge to the sewer, allowing for growth in DoD operations without incurring costly increases in sewage capacity;
-- Encourages comprehensive water planning that integrates water and wastewater management;
-- Reduces freshwater demand benefiting ecosystems stressed by water withdrawals; and
-- Supports sustainability and mission readiness at DoD facilities.

"The Living Machine® system is exactly the type of water reclamation technology that can alleviate water shortages, yet allow large facilities and multi-housing areas, such as training sites, meet their performance requirements without adversely impacting the watershed or water supply," said Will Kirksey, PE, Vice President Worrell Water Technologies.

About the Living Machine® System
The Living Machine® engineered tidal wetland system combines the compact footprint of traditional wastewater treatment technologies with the energy efficiency of conventional constructed wetlands. It produces quality recycled water out of both gray and black water without the chemicals, odor, offensive by-products or high energy usage required by conventional systems. For more information, go to www.livingmachines.com.

About Worrell Water Technologies
Worrell Water Technologies provides ecological wastewater treatment and water purification technologies. The company has an active research and development department, which has dedicated years to provide the means to recycle, purify and replenish our most essential natural resource -- water. Worrell Water's flagship products include the Living Machine® system, a proven ecological wastewater treatment system, and HydroSecure™, the only water purification system that provides the ultimate level of control, safety and security for households and commercial buildings. Headquartered in Charlottesville, Virginia, Worrell Water has a portfolio of proprietary intellectual property and a diverse professional, engineering and research staff. For additional information and photos of the company's products, visit www.worrellwater.com.

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