EPA cites 14 municipalities for stormwater violations

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PHILADELPHIA, PA, Nov. 12, 2009 -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has cited 14 municipalities in Pennsylvania and Maryland for stormwater violations, nine of which are within the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

"EPA, in partnership with the states, is taking clear steps to protect the water quality of local streams and rivers," said Jon M. Capacasa, director of the Water Protection Division for EPA's mid-Atlantic region. "Because many of these municipalities are in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, this action, along with others will also help protect and restore the Bay,"

Urbanized areas contain large portions of impervious surfaces such as roads, rooftops and parking lots that channel stormwater directly into local streams, rivers, and other water bodies. Improperly managed stormwater runoff from urbanized areas often contains high levels of nutrients, sediment, toxic metals, volatile organic compounds, and other pollutants.

EPA requires the cited municipalities to correct problems with their respective municipal separate storm sewer (MS4) programs and come into compliance with their state-issued discharge permits. MS4s are publicly owned drainage systems designed to collect and convey stormwater from urbanized areas.

In Pennsylvania, EPA issued orders to Birdsboro Borough and Ontelaunee Township in Berks County; Mechanicsburg Borough in Cumberland County; Atrim Township in Franklin County; East Donegal Township, Terre Hill Borough, Pequea Township, Akron Borough and East Earl Township in Lancaster County; Myerstown Borough in Lebanon County; and, Monaghan and Newberry Townships in York County.

In Maryland, EPA issued orders to Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County.

Several of these municipalities have already taken steps to comply with the orders.

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