Reclamation develops equipment inspection, cleaning manual to prevent spread of invasive species

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WASHINGTON, DC, Dec. 15, 2009 -- The Bureau of Reclamation has developed and released an Equipment Inspection and Cleaning Manual to help prevent the spread of invasive species through contaminated equipment use. This manual provides recommendations for inspection and cleaning of vehicles and equipment as a prevention tool to limit the spread of invasive species.

"This manual will help equipment operators gain a better understanding of how invasive plants and animals are spread by contaminated equipment into new locations," said Reclamation Invasive Species Program Coordinator and co-author Joe DiVittorio. "This manual has broad applications for many organizations and agencies."

The manual is organized to present equipment inspection techniques, equipment cleaning methods, and finally the identification of invasive biology and habitats of some of the common invasive species that are of potentially high consequence to Reclamation. Examples include quagga and zebra mussels, purple loosestrife, giant salvinia, eurasian watermilfoil, and hydrilla. These and many other invasive species can be inadvertently introduced into new sites on contaminated equipment.

Not all types of equipment are described in the manual, but a process is presented to guide field personnel through general inspection and cleaning decisions for any equipment type.

This manual was developed with the assistance of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

To obtain a copy of the manual, please visit www.usbr.gov/pps.

About the Bureau of Reclamation
Reclamation is the largest wholesale water supplier in the United States, and the nation's second largest producer of hydroelectric power. Its facilities also provide substantial flood control, recreation, and fish and wildlife benefits. Visit our website at http://www.usbr.gov.

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