Water treatment units to supply potable water in Trinidad and Tobago

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MINNEAPOLIS, MN, Feb. 18, 2010 -- According to an online news source, 92% of Trinidad and Tobago's population has drinking water access, but only 26% of its residents has uninterrupted ‐ 24/7 supply of clean water.

AEROMIX Systems, a leader in water and wastewater treatment equipment, has been awarded to supply five containerized water purification systems to WASA (Water and Sewerage Authority) of Trinidad and Tobago. These water systems will each deliver 500,000 gallons per day of potable water to five key locations throughout the islands. (See map.)

AEROMIX Compact Water Treatment Systems offer the following features and benefits:

• Skid mounted or containerized design means the system arrives completed, assembled, plumbed, wired and tested.
• Quality fabricated painted steel frames.
• Outdoor raintight control panels.
• Compact design easy to install on‐site.
• Purified water meets WHO (World Health Organization) standards.

AEROMIX is a world leader in water and wastewater treatment equipment. Please visit www.aeromix.com to learn more about AEROMIX Packaged Plants.

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