Water scarcity projects in Africa boosted through Coca-Cola partnership

Sponsored by

ATLANTA, GA, March 24, 2010 -- A public/private joint investment involving a major drinks manufacturer will see over US$10 million being donated to tackle water quality and scarcity issues throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Coca-Cola Company announced an additional joint investment of US$12.7 million in the ir global partnership, the Water and Development Alliance (WADA).

Through this investment, WADA will support eight new multi-year programs throughout sub-Saharan Africa in Angola, Burundi, Ghana, Malawi, Mozambique, Senegal, South Africa, and Tanzania.

These programs will begin as three-year initiatives and this latest funding brings the total investment from the partnership up to $28.1 million since 2005 to support 32 projects in 22 countries worldwide.

WADA will focus on four objectives: watershed management, water supply and sanitation, hygiene promotion and productive water use.

Rajiv Shah, USAID Administrator, said: "As it enters its fifth year, USAID's partnership with Coca-Cola showcases the potential of the U.S. Government to partner with the private sector to make a long-term impact on pressing global challenges. By matching USAID's development expertise with the resources, capacities, and commitment of the Coca-Cola Company, we are making a positive impact on community water issues throughout the developing world."

William Asiko, president of the Coca-Cola Africa Foundation, added: "We recognise that no single organisation can solve the global water crisis, but by partnering with organisations like USAID we can make a positive difference in the lives of the people in need of safe water and sanitation."

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

WaterWorld launches third WaterShots online photo contest

WaterWorld has officially launched its third WaterShots online photo contest, intended to capture the essence of aging water and wastewater infrastructure across the nation.

CT water treatment plants to make significant upgrades under EPA settlements

The cities of Groton and Norwich, Conn., will make significant upgrades to their drinking water treatment plants by eliminating chlorine gas at these facilities. These actions settle claims by the EPA that the cities violated federal clean air laws meant to prevent chemical accidents.

Expert Q & A: Meeting and Solving Industrial Water Conservation and Regulatory Challenges

U.S. Water Services is a leading national provider of integrated solutions for water treatment. Brand Manager Karen Danielson shares her insights on what's driving industrial water treatment technology innovation and how her company is rising to the challenge.

International collaboration leading to cost-effective agriculture water reuse policies

Researchers at the University of California in Riverside and Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel have partnered to launch a two-year study of the use of treated wastewater in agriculture, which will lead to viable and cost-effective regional water reuse policies.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA