Water scarcity projects in Africa boosted through Coca-Cola partnership

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ATLANTA, GA, March 24, 2010 -- A public/private joint investment involving a major drinks manufacturer will see over US$10 million being donated to tackle water quality and scarcity issues throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Coca-Cola Company announced an additional joint investment of US$12.7 million in the ir global partnership, the Water and Development Alliance (WADA).

Through this investment, WADA will support eight new multi-year programs throughout sub-Saharan Africa in Angola, Burundi, Ghana, Malawi, Mozambique, Senegal, South Africa, and Tanzania.

These programs will begin as three-year initiatives and this latest funding brings the total investment from the partnership up to $28.1 million since 2005 to support 32 projects in 22 countries worldwide.

WADA will focus on four objectives: watershed management, water supply and sanitation, hygiene promotion and productive water use.

Rajiv Shah, USAID Administrator, said: "As it enters its fifth year, USAID's partnership with Coca-Cola showcases the potential of the U.S. Government to partner with the private sector to make a long-term impact on pressing global challenges. By matching USAID's development expertise with the resources, capacities, and commitment of the Coca-Cola Company, we are making a positive impact on community water issues throughout the developing world."

William Asiko, president of the Coca-Cola Africa Foundation, added: "We recognise that no single organisation can solve the global water crisis, but by partnering with organisations like USAID we can make a positive difference in the lives of the people in need of safe water and sanitation."

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