Water infrastructure upgrade contract awarded in South Africa

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JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, April 29, 2010 -- Wastewater treatment company Bluewater Bio has secured its first contract in South Africa which it believes will help with the need to urgently upgrade wastewater treatment infrastructure in the region.

The project, secured through a licensing agreement with Headstream Water, is part of a plant extension that has been designed to treat 7,000m³ per day, with the first phase extension being 3,500m³ per day.

Bluewater Bio’s proprietary Hybrid Bacillus Activated Sludge (HYBACS) process will be deployed and two of its SMART (Shaft Mounted Advanced Reactor Technology) units, which drive the process, will be installed. The second phase to complete the extension is expected to follow once the municipality has secured the required budget. The plant will be owned and operated by the Victor Khanye Local Municipality.

The Botleng Sewage Treatment Plant services the town of Delmas, which lies 60km east of Johannesburg, in the Mpumulanga Province. Botleng is one of two sewage treatment plants (STPs) in the town, the other being the Delmas STP.

Daniel Ishag, CEO of Bluewater Bio, said: “This contract will give Bluewater Bio its first full-scale reference site in Sub-Saharan Africa, providing us with a strong platform for the commercial roll-out of HYBACS throughout the region.”

Commenting on the HYBACS process, Martie Janse van Rensburg, non-executive chairperson of Headstream Water, added: "Its ability to remove nutrients from wastewaters while delivering superior economics and energy savings when compared to conventional plants makes it a very suitable solution to the needs of sewage treatment in South Africa.”

The HYBACS process biologically selects a particular group of bacteria with unusual natural properties which, if correctly stimulated, exhibit higher biological reaction rates than other known naturally occurring bacteria.

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