BP oil spill: Clean-up attempt fails, wetlands under grave threat

Sponsored by

GULF COAST, LA, May 10, 2010 -- The first major attempt at stemming the flow of gushing oil from the broken well pipe in the waters off the Gulf Coast has failed, leaving crews to consider any and all backup plans.

On Friday, crews tried lowering a huge, 100-ton containment box over the well pipe, a strategy that had never before been attempted at such depths where not only pressure but temperature could adversely affect the outcome. Their fears were confirmed when ice crystals clogged the peaked opening at the top of the containment box and rendered the equipment useless.

The next possible steps under consideration include trying to plug the pipe with debris, such as golf balls and tire remnants; lowering another containment box; and hot-tapping the pipe.

Since the Deepwater Horizon explosion on April 20, which killed 11 workers, approximately 3.5 million gallons of crude oil have spilled into Gulf waters and continue to spill at a rate of about 210,000 gallons per day.

A BP internal investigation revealed that a methane bubble caused the explosion.

Late last week, oil residue could be seen washing ashore on islands of the coast of Louisiana. By Saturday, crude oil sludge began washing ashore on Dauphin Island of the coast of Alabama.

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

MD counties to undergo major six-year water, wastewater design project

Louis Berger has been awarded a $4-million, three-year contract with the Washington Sanitary Suburban Commission for a water and sewer design project focusing on financing water and sewer reconstruction programs and inspection and repair of critical water and sewer infrastructure.

CT water authority to improve customer billing with advanced AMI upgrade

The South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority has taken the first steps to upgrade its meter reading system, enabling customer water meters to be read through a radio network that will allow the Authority to use collected data to issue bills monthly, rather than three-month intervals.  

Grit Removal Installation at SC Pollution Control Plant Improves Clarifier, Digester Operation

A new grit removal system at the James B. Messerly Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) in the city of Augusta, S.C., was installed following rigorous independent testing of grit particle size and settling velocity prior to installation of a new stacked tray system, together with grit washing and dewatering.

Texas Drinking Water Facility Upgrades Online Instrumentation with New Analyzers

The drinking water facility in the city of Gordon, Texas, was struck by lightning, causing damage to its online instruments. 

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA