BP oil spill: Response from EPA

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WASHINGTON, DC, May 7, 2010 -- Since the BP Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico on April 22, 2010, EPA has mobilized resources to support the U.S. Coast Guard and protect public health and the environment. Our Emergency Operations Center at headquarters has been activated, trained EPA responders are working on the scene, and special mobile equipment has been sent to the Gulf area.

We have several online resources available:

1) We're posting updated data and other information on our BP oil spill site (www.epa.gov/bpspill):
  • Get air quality and water data
  • Find answers to common questions
  • Submit technology solutions

2) Connect with us on social media sites:

  • Administrator Jackson's personal account of the response to the oil spill: Facebook and Twitter
  • EPA's announcements about our response: Facebook and Twitter

3) Please subscribe to our oil spill updates at http://service.govdelivery.com/service/subscribe.html?code=USAEPA_389.

You can also visit the coordinated government response site (www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com) for:

  • Information about the spill and efforts to stop the oil from flowing
  • Hotlines to report oil on land or injured wildlife
  • Details of how you can volunteer

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