Water sector urges students, job seekers to work for water

Sponsored by

DENVER, CO, May 4, 2010 -- As Drinking Water Week continues, the American Water Works Association (AWWA) is urging students and job seekers to explore the water sector to discover careers that are both central to public health and the environment, and personally and professionally rewarding.

"We rely on safe, sustainable water supplies for everything from drinking to fire protection to public health and sanitation," said Craig Woolard, AWWA president. "Choosing to work for water is choosing to serve both your community and the environment. It's an exciting time to become part of the water workforce, and there are excellent opportunities available."

Career opportunities are available for almost every skill set; workforce shortages are projected for treatment plant operators, distribution system mechanics, engineers, scientists and many other positions from water source to tap.

For more information individuals can view the Water Sector Competency Model, developed by AWWA, the Water Environment Federation, the US Department of Labor and US Environmental Protection Agency. It defines the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities for prospective water professionals and encourages careers in the water sector. The competency model is available on the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop website.

About Drinking Water Week
For more than 35 years, the American Water Works Association and its members have celebrated Drinking Water Week -- a unique opportunity for both water professionals and the communities they serve to join together to recognize the vital role water plays in our daily lives.

Established in 1881, AWWA is the oldest and largest nonprofit, scientific and educational organization dedicated to safe water in North America. AWWA has more than 60,000 members worldwide and its 4,500 utility members serve 80 percent of the U.S. population.

For more information on what only tap water delivers, please visit www.drinktap.org .

AWWA is the authoritative resource for knowledge, information, and advocacy to improve the quality and supply of water in North America and beyond. AWWA is the largest organization of water professionals in the world. AWWA advances public health, safety and welfare by uniting the efforts of the full spectrum of the entire water community. Through our collective strength we become better stewards of water for the greatest good of the people and the environment.


Sponsored by

Did You Like this Article? Get All the Water Industry News Delivered to Your Inbox or Mailbox

Subscribe to one of our magazines or email newsletters today at no cost and receive the latest information.


EPA finalizes rule to reduce pollutants in waterways discharged from steam electric power plants

On Wednesday, Sept. 30, the Environmental Protection Agency finalized a rule that will reduce the discharge of toxic pollutants into America's waterways from steam electric power plants by 1.4 billion pounds annually, as well as reduce water withdrawal by 57 billion gallons per year.

Neglected courtyard transformed into water-efficient outdoor classroom, native garden

In pairing water conservation with inspiration, a neglected courtyard at Cochran Elementary School in West Dallas, Texas, has been transformed into a water-efficient outdoor classroom and native garden that will be used to teach and delight thousands of students for years to come.

WERF, WRF seek proposals to support energy research at water, wastewater plants

The Water Environment Research Foundation has combined resources with the Water Research Foundation to continue critical energy research for water and wastewater facilities. Proposals are sought for two new projects to dig deeper into factors affecting energy projects.

USDA commits $4M in several states to improve Chesapeake Bay water quality

In a first round of funding, the USDA announced that it will commit $4 million to several states in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed to help agricultural landowners accelerate stream and riverbank tree plantings that can reduce soil sedimentation and field and animal waste runoff.




© 2015. PennWell Corporation. All Rights Reserved. PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS AND CONDITIONS