Water treatment technology to be implemented for on-site cleanup in Marcellus Shale region

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• Purestream Technology contracts with PDC Mountaineer for on-site wastewater cleanup

SALT LAKE CITY, UT, Sept. 13, 2010 -- Purestream Technology has announced plans to implement its cutting edge water treatment technology in the Marcellus Shale region. The announcement comes as part of a contract with West Virginia based PDC Mountaineer, LLC. Purestream will install part of its Trilogy system at PDC's operation in Taylor County, West Virginia. The Purestream system will evaporate flow back water on site.

Purestream's Trilogy solution offers both an economic incentive to producers, as well as greatly reducing the impact of oil and gas waste on the environment. A unique feature of the system is its modular size. Located onsite, a standard Trilogy unit can process up to 1500 barrels of water per day, effectively removing harmful waste from both the water and air emissions. In addition, Trilogy is very energy efficient. The system is able to recycle waste heat into reusable power.

Andrea Metil oversees Purestream's operations in the Eastern region of the United States. "Wastewater has become a problem in Marcellus. As a Pennsylvania native, I am beyond excited about the development and what it means for the Appalachian region, but we need to be good stewards of the environment and address issues as they arise. Purestream's Trilogy system allows us to clean and evaporate toxic wastewater on site, reducing air pollution from trucking and preventing contaminated water from re-entering the eco system. It is a practical, affordable option for addressing one of the region's most significant environmental challenges."

Trilogy was developed in partnership with Utah State University's Energy and Space Dynamics Labs. "Utah State University is recognized throughout the world as a leader in thermal management technologies for space-based and terrestrial applications and we'll use some of those technologies to help provide oil and gas well owners with an affordable way to comply with current environmental regulations and potential future legislation that will affect their industry," said Dr. Douglas K. Lemon, President, Utah State University Research Foundation.

How Trilogy Works:

Wastewater Disposal:
-- Removes contaminates from wastewater, rendering it cleaner than drinking water.

Air Emissions Scrubbing:

-- The Trilogy System captures volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the wellhead, separates hydrocarbons, then heats and scrubs to eliminate particulates, releasing clean air into the environment.

Combined Heat and Power:

-- The Trilogy System uses waste heat to power its own operations, resulting in cleaner and more efficient power for well operators.
-- Additional power- generated but not used by the system can be integrated into the power grid.

Remote Data Tracking:

-- The Trilogy System provides remote tracking of produced wastewater, oil and condensate from point of origin to point of disposal or sale.
-- The tracking component replaces the antiquated manual processes currently employed industry-wide, providing accurate data, complete transparency and third-party validation.

Web: www.purestreamtechnology.com

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