Watershed grants awarded in Michigan for President's Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Sponsored by

EAST LANSING, MI, Sept. 24, 2010 -- Nearly $2 million in federal grants to five Michigan organizations were announced here this afternoon by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The grants are part of President Obama's Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a $475 million program that represents the largest investment in the Great Lakes in two decades.

A total of 99 grants for an estimated $63 million are expected to be awarded in Michigan.

Cameron Davis, EPA's Senior Advisor on the Great Lakes, announced the grants at a news conference on the campus of Michigan State University. Two of the grants are for projects run by tribes in the Upper Peninsula. This helps advance EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson's priority for expanding the conversation on environmental issues.

The five grants announced today are:

  • Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment, $856,046 for implementing state and regional mercury control and prevention strategies to help shield pregnant women, children and subsistence populations from the toxic effects of mercury.
  • Saginaw Bay/Lake Huron Land Policy Project, Michigan State University, $399,287 for technical assistance to local governments and land owners to implement land use planning, protection and restoration strategies.
  • Michigan State University, $65,001 for a project to improve forecasting of beach and nearshore health effects, and protect public health by informing people when beach water is clean enough for swimming.
  • Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, $295,000 for development of a sustainable hazardous waste collection program to serve tribal and non-tribal community members in Baraga County, and help prevent toxic contaminants from entering Lake Superior.
  • Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa, $196,148 to improve habitat and water quality in the Bear River Watershed, which directly affects waters flowing into Little Traverse Bay on Lake Michigan.

The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, led by EPA, involves 16 federal agencies. EPA is awarding $160 million in grants for aggressive community-based efforts to address five priorities:

  • Cleaning up toxics and toxic hot spots around the Great Lakes.
  • Combating invasive species.
  • Promoting nearshore health by protecting watersheds from polluted runoff.
  • Restoring wetlands and other habitats.
  • Accountability and working with strategic partners on outreach.

In addition to EPA, the federal agencies that make up the Great Lakes Interagency Task Force are:
White House Council on Environmental Quality.

  • U.S. Department of Agriculture.
  • U.S. Department of Commerce.
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  • U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
  • U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
  • U.S. Department of State.
  • U.S. Department of the Army.
  • U.S. Department of Interior.
  • U.S. Department of Transportation.

For more on the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, please visit www.greatlakesrestoration.us.

###

Sponsored by

Did You Like this Article? Get All the Water Industry News Delivered to Your Inbox or Mailbox

Subscribe to one of our magazines or email newsletters today at no cost and receive the latest information.

TODAY'S HEADLINES

KS Health Foundation to fund up to $2M for clean drinking water grants

The Kansas Health Foundation recently announced that it is now accepting requests for proposals to fund organizations that will improve health outcomes by improving Kansans' access to clean, safe drinking water.

Singularity University launches Global Water Impact Challenge in California

In an effort to address California's water supply challenge amid ongoing drought, Singularity University has partnered with Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom to call on entrepreneurs around the world to submit exponential technology solutions that will help remedy the state's water scarcity.

MO American Water files rate request for water, sewer services in all districts

Missouri American Water has filed an application with the Missouri Public Service Commission to adjust rates for water and sewer service in all of the company's operating districts.

Research reveals filtration favored over disinfection when treating ballast water

When treating ships' ballast water, new research conducted by the Analytical BioGeoChemistry research unit at the Helmholtz Zentrum München in Germany shows that filtration -- rather than disinfection -- can potentially serve as a more efficient method.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA

  

 


© 2015. PennWell Corporation. All Rights Reserved. PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS AND CONDITIONS