Sewer cleaning productivity skyrockets in Detroit

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DETROIT, MI, Oct. 12, 2010 -- The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) today announced significant improvements made in 2010 in sewer cleaning operations undertaken by DWSD workers. So far this year, employees have cleaned two million linear feet of sewers in the DWSD system.

"This represents a 1000 percent increase in cleaning activities over those of the last three years, and at this rate of production, our entire sewer collection system in the city of Detroit will be cleaned once every five years," said DWSD Deputy Director Darryl A. Latimer.

Latimer noted that the feat was accomplished by utilizing City employees and City equipment, and not with any outside contractors. "Our employees are dedicated to better serving our customers, and this achievement shows determination and initiative," Latimer said.

DWSD supplies high-quality drinking water to approximately 4 million people who live and work in Detroit and 126 other communities in southeast Michigan. The Department provides wastewater services to three million people who live and work in Detroit and 76 other southeast Michigan communities.

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