Arsenic in drinking water tied to stroke risk

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NEW YORK, NY, Nov. 4, 2010 -- Reuters is reporting that the results of a study of Michigan residents suggests people who live in areas with moderately elevated levels of arsenic in the drinking-water supply may have a somewhat increased risk of stroke.

The study's lead research told Reuters Health that the findings do not prove that arsenic in drinking water is responsible for the elevated risk, nor do they suggest that water with arsenic levels that meet EPA guidelines are a stroke hazard.

The study does indicate that more in-depth research is warranted to determine whether arsenic in the water supply is contributing to some strokes.

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