Water pipeline replacement contract in San Diego goes to GEI Consultants

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SACRAMENTO, CA, Nov. 16, 2010 -- GEI Consultants Inc., one of the nation's leading geotechnical, environmental, water resources, and ecological science and engineering firms, announced today that it has been awarded the design contract for the San Vicente Bypass Pipeline Project from the San Diego County Water Authority. The contract is to design a replacement pipeline for the one currently in place.

The San Vicente Bypass Pipeline is an integral part of the City of San Diego's water conveyance infrastructure. It is used to deliver water directly from the Water Authority's first aqueduct to the City's Alvarado water treatment plant as well as to fill El Capitan Reservoir. The San Vicente Dam Raise Project will cause the pipeline to be inundated due to expansion of the reservoir, and the inundated portion must be replaced in order to maintain the functionality of the City's water delivery system.

GEI's design contract includes geotechnical investigations, as well as hydraulic modeling of the integrated Water Authority and City conveyance systems. Key elements include replacement of the existing San Vicente Bypass Pipeline, modification of a terminal structure that connects the first aqueduct to the bypass pipeline, and construction of a new access road to the terminal structure. Throughout construction, the existing bypass pipeline will remain operational.

The $20M San Vicente Bypass Pipeline Project is scheduled to be completed in 2013.

About GEI Consultants Inc.
GEI's multi-disciplined team of engineers and scientists deliver integrated geotechnical, environmental, water resources and ecological solutions to diverse clientele nationwide. The firm has provided a broad range of consulting and engineering services on over 25,000 projects in 50 states and 22 countries. For more information, please visit the firm's web site at www.geiconsultants.com.

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