Japan Earthquake leads to Water Supplies running dry

Sponsored by

TOKYO, Japan, Mar. 14, 2011 -- The 8.9 magnitude earthquake that has brought the east coast of Japan to its knees has caused huge disruption to the country's water supply.

Around 1.4 million households are without running water, but the World Health Organisation said that "there has been some improvement in the provision of electricity and water services". It said that 13 prefectures are without water, compared to 17 yesterday.

The most affected prefectures from water shortages include: Miyagi, Fukushima, Yamagata, Ibaraki, Tochigi, Chiba, Akita and Aomori.

Meanwhile, the Japan Water Works Association is reported to be gathering information on water supply condition and could release the information through the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare over the next two days, according to Bloomberg.

As part of a national emergency committee, led by the prime minister, over 250,000 bottles of water have been distributed, with beer tankers being used to transport water and 5,000 mobile latrines have also been deployed.

Prime Minister Naoto Kan reportedly said: "This is the toughest crisis in Japan's 65 years of postwar history...whether we Japanese can overcome this crisis depends on each of us."

Only four days after the earthquake and official government figures suggest over 1,600 people have been confirmed dead, with 1,962 injured and 1,720 missing. These figures are expected to rise and various media reports suggest the death count could increase to 10,000.

Water supply in some parts of Tokyo has also stopped, the metropolitan government's Bureau of Waterworks said, according to Bloomberg.

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

EPA to assist water utilities in improving resilience to climate change

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced that it will be providing up to $600,000 in training and technical assistance to help water utilities in more than 20 communities across the U.S. bolster their climate change resilience and readiness.

WRF research develops tool to help utilities reduce leakage losses in distribution system

Through recently completed research and development of a new leakage analysis tool, the "Water Audits and Real Loss Component Analysis" project, the Water Research Foundation is helping water utilities better understand and control leakage in a cost-effective manner. 

Local orgs praise EPA for advancing affordability framework for municipal CWA requirements

The EPA released a "Financial Capability Assessment Framework for Municipal Clean Water Act Requirements," which was the result of nearly two years of discussions with representatives of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, National League of Cities and National Association of Counties.

New Zealand farms improve demanding effluent transfers with progressing cavity pump

NOV Mono has provided a Mono progressing cavity pump to replace a number of centrifugal pumps at Castle Glen Farms in the town of Foxton, New Zealand, in an effort to transfer animal effluent over considerable distances.  

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA