Pressure management system to help UK's Severn Trent cut water leakage

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Mar. 3, 2011 -- i2O Water has been awarded a framework contract by Severn Trent Water for its cutting-edge pressure management system.

After a tendering process Southampton-based i2O has signed a five-year framework agreement to supply Severn Trent with its PRV control application. This will minimise leakage and burst frequency in Severn Trent's District Metering Areas (DMAs).

"We have worked very closely with Severn Trent over a period of four years to develop our technology and are delighted that they have awarded us a framework contract for our pressure management system," said Adam Kingdon, CEO of i2O Water.

"Pressure management is the cornerstone of Severn Trent's plan to reduce leakage over the next five years and we expect the i2O systems to play a major role in achieving this. Severn Trent also expects the i2O system to give operational cost savings and to reduce the risk of DG2 (low pressure) incidents."

i2O Water installed its very first system on one of Severn Trent's Leicestershire DMAs in January 2008.

The framework contract was awarded following a successful 20-system pilot installed by i2O Water in 2009, which saved an average of 60m3/day per DMA.

i2O Water is based at the University of Southampton Science Park in Southampton and employs 35 people. It prides itself on being a forward-thinking UK company that has designed cutting-edge technology to tackle the worldwide problem of water leakage.

i2O Water's technology has been installed across the UK and worldwide. A total of 100 i2O systems have so far been installed in Malaysia and these are expected to save 17.5 million litres of water per day. Systems have also been installed in Spain, Italy, Mexico, South Africa and the Philippines.

How the i2O system works
The i2O system manages pressure on the water distribution network, continually adjusting and controlling the pressure so that it is kept to the optimal level throughout the day and night. This significantly reduces leakage and the number of new bursts, and therefore saves huge amounts of water. Not only that, disruption caused by roads being dug up to find leaks and repair burst mains is substantially reduced. Web: www.i2owater.com

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