Maine water utility adopts geocentric modeling technology

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BROOMFIELD, CO, Apr. 19, 2011 -- The Greater Augusta Utility District, ME, has chosen InfoWater Suite and InfoWater UDF software from Innovyze as its advanced water distribution modeling solution. The decision helps the utility leverage its investment in ArcGIS technology from Esri (Redlands, CA) by giving it a technologically advanced GIS-centric software platform for operating and managing its water distribution system.

The Great Augusta Utility District serves Maine's capital region. The new software suite will give them the ability to build, calibrate and analyze complex water models quickly while working in the ArcGIS environment. The district will also use the InfoWater UDF module to create detailed flushing sequences and plan a unidirectional flushing program for the district.

InfoWater is a fully GIS-integrated network modeling and design application using the latest Microsoft .NET and Esri ArcObjects component technologies. While it addresses all the operations of a typical water distribution system, the software also helps engineers develop high quality designs and capital improvement programs. Users can quickly and accurately perform the most difficult hydraulic analyses, including multi-point and extended period fire flow simulations, variable speed pumps, and very advanced water quality calculations -- then employ an array of ArcGIS presentation tools to showcase the results.

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