Texas water district to install large capacity hypochlorite generators

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LEWISVILLE, TX, May 6, 2011 -- The Upper Trinity Regional Water District will install three new hypochlorite generators at its Thomas E. Taylor Regional Water Treatment Plant in Lewisville, Texas.

The MicrOclor Model MC-2000 units from Process Systems each offer 2000 pounds per day of free available chlorine (FAC) capacity, for a total capacity of 6000 pounds per day.

Hypochlorite generation uses salt, water, and electricity to generate a dilute bleach solution on site, eliminating the storage and transport of hazardous chlorine chemicals and offering an expected operational cost savings over bulk delivered hypochlorite.

The systems, which will replace an older hypochlorite system installed about 10 years ago, are now onsite and installation is expected to be complete in late Spring 2011.

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