Sewage discharge violations result in DOJ complaint against Unalaska, AK

Sponsored by

SEATTLE, WA, June 24, 2011 -- The U.S. Department of Justice has filed a Clean Water Act complaint against the City of Unalaska, Alaska, and the State of Alaska.

The complaint, filed on behalf of the U.S. EPA, alleges that the city's wastewater treatment plant reported more than 4,800 violations of discharge permit pollution limits between October 2004 and October 2010. As a result, partially-treated sewage was discharged into South Unalaska Bay. That sewage contained several pollutants including fecal coliform bacteria at levels well above legal limits.

The court is being asked to order the city to undertake all measures necessary to comply with the Clean Water Act and its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit, including any necessary structural and operational changes to its facility. The complaint also seeks a civil penalty.

Unalaska Bay is listed as an impaired water-body and is home to several endangered or threatened species including sea otters, yellow-billed loons and Steller's eiders, a species of sea duck.

More information about the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program: http://cfpub.epa.gov/npdes/index.cfm

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

$9.6B invested in nature-based solutions in 2013 to sustain global clean water supplies, finds study

In an effort to sustain clean water supplies across the globe, governments and companies in 2013 invested $9.6 billion in initiatives to implement nature-based solutions, according to a new report from Forest Trends' Ecosystem Marketplace.

OR brewing company installs advanced green roof, protects local waterways

This summer, Ninkasi Brewing Company's administrative building opened in the city of Eugene, Ore., and features a state-of-the-art rooftop garden that helps protect local waterways.

Key global shale resources face growing water stress, finds report

According to a new report by the World Resources Institute, governments and businesses using hydraulic fracturing to develop shale gas could face intense water competition in the world's largest reserves.

Medium-voltage AC drive

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA