Wastewater treatment capacity boosted in South Africa

Sponsored by

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, June 7, 2011 -- Wastewater company Bluewater Bio International has completed installation of its HYBACS process at the Botleng wastewater treatment plant in South Africa, which is now serving 17,000 residents.

The project is expected to cost in the region of 55 million Rand (c. £5 million) when a future second phase extension planned by the municipality brings the treatment capacity to a total of 7,000m³/day.

A licensing agreement with Headstream Water Holdings secured the project, which has helped to extend the sewage treatment plant which the firm said was "overloaded and in need of additional capacity".

The extension comprises a 3,500m³ per day treatment plant, including Bluewater Bio’s patented HYBACS process. This includes two of its SMART (Shaft Mounted Advanced Reactor Technology) units, and the nutrient removal plant treats municipal wastewater with Chemical Oxygen Demand, ammonia and Total Phosphorus concentrations of c. 600mg/l, 45 mg/l and 6 mg/l, respectively.

The Botleng Wastewater Treatment Plant services the town of Delmas in the Mpumulanga Province and lies 60 km east of Johannesburg, with a population of approximately 92,000.

Botleng is one of two wastewater treatment plants (WTPs) in the town, the other being the Delmas town WTP. The plant is owned and operated by the Victor Khanye Local Municipality, which has prioritised expanding the capacity of both facilities.

Martie Janse van Rensburg, non executive chairperson of Headstream Water Holdings, said: “This first deployment of Bluewater Bio’s HYBACS technology in South Africa will be shortly followed by the installation at Swartruggens. We are also confident of securing our third and largest project in Q3 this year."

Daniel Ishag, CEO of Bluewater Bio, said that the firm has secured a second order in the country for a plant, which is currently in construction at Swartruggens, a town about 60 miles North West of Johannesburg.

He added: "We are working closely with Headstream to secure our third order, also near Johannesburg, along with additional sales prospects in both South Africa and its neighbouring countries."

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

EPA awards OK $1.2M to address petroleum leaks in underground storage tanks

The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced that it has awarded the Oklahoma Corporation Conservation Commission $459,000 to respond to petroleum leaks from underground storage tanks.

CA's 'Save Our Water' program launches new public education campaign

Amid ongoing drought, Save Our Water -- California's official statewide water conservation education program -- is launching a new public education campaign urging Californians to step up and make even more cuts in their water use.  

Research reveals water used for hydraulic fracturing varies widely across U.S.

According to the first national-scale analysis and map of hydraulic fracturing water usage detailed in a new study, the amount of water required to hydraulically fracture oil and gas wells varies widely across the country. 

GE announces opening of Alberta's first mobile water service center

GE has announced the opening of a new mobile water service center in Edmonton -- the first of its kind in Alberta -- designed to rapidly decrease response time and cost for customers located in Western Canada and the northern United States.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA

  

 


© 2015. PennWell Corporation. All Rights Reserved. PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS AND CONDITIONS