Wastewater treatment capacity boosted in South Africa

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JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, June 7, 2011 -- Wastewater company Bluewater Bio International has completed installation of its HYBACS process at the Botleng wastewater treatment plant in South Africa, which is now serving 17,000 residents.

The project is expected to cost in the region of 55 million Rand (c. £5 million) when a future second phase extension planned by the municipality brings the treatment capacity to a total of 7,000m³/day.

A licensing agreement with Headstream Water Holdings secured the project, which has helped to extend the sewage treatment plant which the firm said was "overloaded and in need of additional capacity".

The extension comprises a 3,500m³ per day treatment plant, including Bluewater Bio’s patented HYBACS process. This includes two of its SMART (Shaft Mounted Advanced Reactor Technology) units, and the nutrient removal plant treats municipal wastewater with Chemical Oxygen Demand, ammonia and Total Phosphorus concentrations of c. 600mg/l, 45 mg/l and 6 mg/l, respectively.

The Botleng Wastewater Treatment Plant services the town of Delmas in the Mpumulanga Province and lies 60 km east of Johannesburg, with a population of approximately 92,000.

Botleng is one of two wastewater treatment plants (WTPs) in the town, the other being the Delmas town WTP. The plant is owned and operated by the Victor Khanye Local Municipality, which has prioritised expanding the capacity of both facilities.

Martie Janse van Rensburg, non executive chairperson of Headstream Water Holdings, said: “This first deployment of Bluewater Bio’s HYBACS technology in South Africa will be shortly followed by the installation at Swartruggens. We are also confident of securing our third and largest project in Q3 this year."

Daniel Ishag, CEO of Bluewater Bio, said that the firm has secured a second order in the country for a plant, which is currently in construction at Swartruggens, a town about 60 miles North West of Johannesburg.

He added: "We are working closely with Headstream to secure our third order, also near Johannesburg, along with additional sales prospects in both South Africa and its neighbouring countries."

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