Drinking water system improvements in Hot Sulphur Springs recognized by EPA

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DENVER, CO, Aug. 22, 2011 -- The town of Hot Sulphur Springs, CO, has received EPA's Drinking Water State Revolving Fund award recognizing improvements to the community's drinking water treatment system.

In 2009, the town received $3.3 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds for the design and construction of a new water intake, a pretreatment retrofit, a new treatment system, and a new well and water storage tank. The new system incorporated membrane treatment, an innovative filtration process that prevents giardia and other pathogens from entering the water supply.

The project design, as well as associated habitat improvements, was coordinated in partnership with the US Army Corps of Engineers and the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The $3.3 million loan was funded by the Recovery Act and included a $2 million subsidy through principal forgiveness. The project award was made through the State of Colorado's Drinking Water Revolving Fund, which is funded by EPA.

"Hot Sulphur Springs is one of several Colorado communities that have used Recovery Act funds to make innovative, long-term investments in public health by modernizing water infrastructure," said Brian Friel, coordinator of EPA's state revolving fund program in Denver. "These drinking water upgrades will improve efficiency, reduce operating costs, and ensure safe drinking water for years to come."

For more on the Town's drinking water efforts, visit: http://www.hotsulphurwater.com/
For more information on EPA's drinking water loan program: http://www.epa.gov/safewater/dwsrf?index.html

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