Water clarity of Lake Tahoe to improve under new TMDL

Sponsored by

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, Aug. 16, 2011 -- State and federal officials have inked a new Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for Lake Tahoe that provides a roadmap for restoring the lake's clarity.

The agreement, signed by California Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval and U.S. EPA Regional Administrator Jared Blumenfeld, charts a course for returning the lake to almost 100 feet of clarity within 65 years.

The water clarity of Lake Tahoe declined from a visibility level of 105 feet in 1967 to an all time low of 64 feet in 1997. Ten years of scientific study ascertained that fine particulate matter is the prime factor in diminished clarity at Lake Tahoe.

Scientific analysis demonstrates that restoring lake clarity is possible if pollutant load reductions can be achieved in each of the four primary sources of these pollutants: urban stormwater runoff, forest runoff, stream channel erosion and atmospheric deposition.

The TMDL outlines measures to reduce each of these sources, with a focus on the urban stormwater runoff source, as it is both the greatest source and the best opportunity to control the pollutants. The TMDL calls for advanced and innovative controls to achieve the needed pollution reductions.

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

MED desalination expansion worth $120m awarded in Saudi

A US$120 million contract has been awarded by the Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC) for the expansion of the Shuaiba Phase 2 desalination plant in Saudi Arabia...

American Water enters exclusive U.S. partnership with ino3W water technology accelerator

American Water announced that it has entered an exclusive U.S. partnership with ino3W, a global water technology validation accelerator.

DOE now accepting applications for $3.6M Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program

The U.S. Department of Energy has announced an incentive program for developers adding hydroelectric power generating capabilities to existing non-powered dams throughout the United States.

Water reuse technology helps PA power plant save 1.3 MGD of drinking water

Covanta's Delaware Valley energy-from-waste facility in Chester, Pa., has saved 1.3 million gallons per day from local water supplies by installing advanced water reuse technology from GE in the power plant's cooling tower.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA