College students challenged to develop innovative approaches to stormwater management

Sponsored by

WASHINGTON, DC, May 17, 2012 -- The U.S. EPA is launching a new design competition called the Campus RainWorks Challenge to encourage student teams on college and university campuses across the country to develop innovative approaches to stormwater management. The competition is intended to help raise awareness of green design and planning approaches at colleges and universities, and train the next generation of landscape architects, planners, and engineers in green infrastructure principles and design.

Student teams, working with a faculty advisor, will submit design plans for a proposed green infrastructure project for their campus. Registration for the Campus RainWorks Challenge opens September 4, and entries must be submitted by December 14, 2012 for consideration.

Winning entries will be selected by EPA and announced in April 2013. Winning teams will earn a cash prize of $1,500 - $2,500, as well as $8,000 - $11,000 in funds for their faculty advisor to conduct research on green infrastructure.

In 2013, EPA plans to expand Campus RainWorks by inviting students to design and complete a demonstration project assessing innovative green infrastructure approaches on their campus.

"Reducing stormwater pollution requires innovative approaches and America's college students are incredibly creative and talented," said Nancy Stoner, acting assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Water. "The Campus RainWorks Challenge will engage students across the country in tackling one of the toughest challenges to clean water and show them the opportunities in environmental careers."

EPA is encouraging the use of green infrastructure as a solution to help manage stormwater runoff. Green Infrastructure uses vegetation, soils, and natural processes to manage stormwater runoff at its source and provide other community benefits, including economic development.. Green infrastructure is increasingly being used to supplement or substitute for single-purpose "gray" infrastructure investments such as pipes, and ponds. The Campus RainWorks Challenge will help encourage the use of green infrastructure projects on college and university campuses to manage stormwater discharges.

More information on the Campus RainWorks Challenge:
http://water.epa.gov/infrastructure/greeninfrastructure/crw_challenge.cfm

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

Research reveals dramatic growth of global hydropower expected this decade

Based on new statistics, an unprecedented boom in global hydropower dam construction is underway, primarily in developing countries and emerging economies.

DOD, NIH awards Cambrian prestigious contracts to further develop advanced biotechnologies

Cambrian Innovation recently won a prestigious contract from the Department of Defense and another two from the National Institutes of Health to further develop biotechnologies to dramatically improve water treatment, testing and remediation.

MWH Global promotes nearly a dozen employees to VP positions

MWH Global has officially announced the promotion of three employees to senior vice president and eight others to vice president. The promotions were confirmed by the MWH board of directors at its August board meeting.

Online Zeta Potential Measurement Provides Water Treatment Control, Cost Reduction

Online zeta potential measurements can provide real-time water quality monitoring and support effective process control under all circumstances. The value of online measurement is illustrated through the experiences of Aurora Water, which is using zeta potential at one facility as both an offline and online tool for monitoring and controlling water treatment processes.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA