Reynolds Inliner changes name to Layne

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ORLEANS, IN, Aug. 8, 2012 – Reynolds Inliner, a wastewater infrastructure renewal contractor, has been renamed Layne Inliner to reflect its status as a member of the Layne family of companies. Layne Christensen Company acquired Reynolds Inliner in 2005.

“After seven years, it’s time to embrace the Layne brand and honor the new history we are writing together,” said Denise McClanahan, vice president of Layne Inliner. “Layne has provided us with the opportunity to not only grow through acquisitions and territorial expansions but also to advance in the products and services we provide – products like Janssen structural renewal and most recently the ability to offer an ultraviolet light-cured Inliner product.”

Layne Inliner operates out of 13 offices from Maine to Colorado. Its subsidiaries include Inliner Technologies, the nation’s second-largest cured-in-place pipe company, and Liner Products, a CIPP lining tube manufacturer.

As a full-service wastewater infrastructure contractor, Layne Inliner also performs Janssen lateral and mainline renovation, sliplining, service line and manhole renewal, U-Liner fold and form and traditional excavation and replacement.

Layne Christensen Company took root in South Dakota in 1882 as a well drilling company. Throughout the decades, the company grew geographically and in 1950 expanded into the water treatment industry. The addition of Reynolds and its 70-year history to the Layne family of companies in 2005 brought full circle the group’s collective water and wastewater capabilities.

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