Water quality in CT potentially compromised by Hurricane Sandy

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HARTFORD, CT, Oct. 30, 2012 -- Water quality in Connecticut may have been compromised by sewage backups or pollution caused by raging seawater churned up by Superstorm Sandy.

The Hartford Courant reports that Norwalk Mayor Richard Moccia says the city's sewage treatment plant was to be shut down Monday night to minimize damage from the high tide expected later. He says residents would be told to not flush their toilets.

State environmental officials say 24 treatment plants along Connecticut's shore could be affected by the storm surge.

The state Department of Public Health is warning residents that drinking water sources could be contaminated by flood waters. Flooding could lead to sewage backing up in homes.

Health officials also say public water systems could be compromised by a tidal surge and well water in flooded areas should be disinfected before use.

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