New NC recycling facility converts wastewater into biofuel

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Charlotte, NC, April 23, 2013 -- They say one man's trash is another man's treasure. On Earth Day, it certainly rang true for a newly open recycling facility converting wastewater into fuel. BlackGold Biofuels, a Philadelphia-based company, has opened a recycling facility in Charlotte, N.C., for area restaurant kitchens' wastewater, cleaning up the water and recovering a biofuel in the process. While it has become common practice to recycle deep fryer oil, the recycling of oils that are in kitchen wastewater has proven much more elusive. The facility is the first of its kind in the area.

The Charlotte facility, located near the intersection of I-77 and I-85, receives grease trap waste from local wastewater haulers that is generated in commercial and institutional kitchens during dishwashing and food preparation. BlackGold Biofuels removes trash and food particles from this wastewater. It then extracts and purifies the recovered plant- and animal-based oils. The recovered oil is utilized in the production of biofuels, helping to offset the use of petroleum-based fuels, strengthening regional energy security and domestic energy independence.

By cleaning the water prior to discharge, the BlackGold Biofuels facility reduces the burden on the region's wastewater treatment plants. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency names blockages from this grease as a top culprit in sewer overflows nationwide. It is estimated that grease is responsible for 50 to 60 percent of Charlotte area sanitary sewer overflows. Currently in the U.S., grease trap waste is often landfilled or spread on fields. The material can be sent to anaerobic digestion to produce biogas for energy use, but the digestion process results in the loss of more than 70 percent of the energy contained in the grease, and few facilities have the expensive infrastructure to convert it into energy. Lacking compelling alternatives, much of this waste ends up in the sewer system. BlackGold Biofuels' state-of-the-art facility transforms this nuisance waste into a valuable resource, to the benefit of the local community.

"Proper grease trap maintenance is critical to the efficient functioning of the wastewater treatment system." Explained Jackie Jarrell, Charlotte Mecklenburg Utilities' Superintendent of the Environmental Management Division. "Creating high-use beneficial reuses helps divert this waste out of our sewers and into compliant pathways, creating a financial and environmental win for the region."

BlackGold Biofuels, the developer behind BlackGold Biofuels of Charlotte, is based in Philadelphia but is building a network of these recycling facilities throughout the Southeast and mid-Atlantic. Additional North Carolina facilities are under development in Winston-Salem and Raleigh.

"We are proud to provide Charlotte area businesses with the lowest cost, most reliable and environmentally friendly solution for recycling this waste," explained Emily Landsburg, CEO of BlackGold Biofuels.

About BlackGold Biofuels: BlackGold Biofuels specializes in resource recovery from wastewater streams, focusing on the recycling of fat, oil, and grease-laden wastewaters from commercial kitchens and food processors. BlackGold uses best available technologies to recover the greatest economic and environmental value from these waste streams. The company developed and patented a chemical process to convert these greases into biodiesel, a low-carbon diesel fuel. More information can be found at www.BlackGoldbiofuels.com, by calling 215-253-5844, or by e-mailing info@BlackGoldbiofuels.com.

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