Global water, wastewater treatment revenues expected to reach $3B in 2019, finds report

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LONDON, June 25, 2013 -- New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.environmental.frost.com), Global Water and Wastewater Disinfection Systems Market, has found that the water and wastewater disinfection systems market earned revenues of $1.94 billion in 2012 and expects it to reach $2.96 billion in 2019. The research covers locations (APAC, EU, Americas and Middle East and Africa), technologies (chlorine disinfection, UV and AOP, ozone, electro chlorination and others), end users (municipal and industrial), and applications (water and wastewater).

The need for disinfection in water and wastewater treatment processes is growing as rapid industrialization and urbanization call for more extensive water reuse. Moreover, stringent legislation is driving the water and wastewater disinfection systems market. To fully leverage the market enormous growth potential, particularly in developing regions, companies will need to provide cost-effective solutions.

Globally, Europe had the highest market share in 2012, followed by the Americas and Asia-Pacific (APAC). While the diversion of water utility funds in the Americas is projected to slacken growth in the region, APAC will emerge as a powerhouse due to rapid population expansion, intensifying water demand, and high industrialization rates.

"Numerous water-specific directives such as the Clean Water Act (USA), the Drinking Water Directive (Europe), and the Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive (Europe) are raising the bar on water quality standards," noted Frost & Sullivan's Energy & Environmental Research Analyst Vandhana Ravi. "Legislative enforcement, together with public health and safety concerns linked to poor quality drinking water, will reinforce the adoption of water and wastewater disinfection systems."

Despite the widespread acceptance that disinfection is vital to managing scarce water resources, high overall expenditure -- including capital investments, running costs and service and maintenance outlays -- are acting as a major restraint to uptake. This is particularly the case in developing and poorly developed countries.

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