Wastewater discharge monitoring system helps MO permit holders prepare reports

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO, June 28, 2013 -- A new online tool was released by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) that helps Missouri wastewater permit holders submit required wastewater discharge monitoring reports electronically.

MDNR Director Sara Parker Pauley addressed a gathering of municipal leaders and explained how the department is taking another step in efficiency with the electronic discharge monitoring (eDMR) report. "Almost a year ago, we rolled out ePermitting, which simplified the process for those seeking land disturbance permits. With eDMR, we're simplifying the reporting process for Missouri's estimated 4,500 wastewater permit holders."

Some wastewater systems are required to submit discharge monitoring reports that summarize effluent monitoring results. The eDMR system allows wastewater treatment facilities to submit their reports via the internet. Historically, the reports were handled entirely through a paper recording and submission process. 

The eDMR system will be faster and more efficient than the current system and will greatly reduce the amount of time and labor wastewater facilities spend preparing these reports. Additionally, eDMR will save the department time and improve accuracy by eliminating potential errors that might be introduced by manual data entry. The eDMR system is the Department of Natural Resources' second major online initiative aimed at improving permitting time and efficiency. The ePermitting system, launched in June of last year, allows Missourians to apply for and receive land disturbance permits entirely online.

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