UMASS student receives AWWA water scholarship for drinking water research

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VOORHEES, NJ, July 11, 2013 -- Joe Goodwill, a doctoral student at the University of Massachusetts -- Amherst, has been chosen as the recipient of the American Water Works Association's (AWWA) 2013 American Water Scholarship for his exceptional academic abilities, industrial experience and leadership to contribute to the advancement of science in the field of drinking water. American Water (NYSE: AWK), the largest publicly traded U.S. water and wastewater utility company, recently announced the news.

The scholarship is an annual award of $5,000 presented to a graduate level student to assist with the development of professionals interested in service to the water industry. Goodwill was selected for this scholarship due to his current research focuses on ferrate, which is a powerful form of iron that can function as an oxidant, coagulant and disinfectant when applied for water treatment. He is an advocate for public health both locally and globally with significant experience combating the global water crisis through international development.

"American Water is pleased to present this prestigious award to Joe, who was selected among 45 outstanding applicants," said Dr. Mark LeChevallier, director of Innovation & Environmental Stewardship and member of the award selection committee.

Administered by AWWA, American Water's Scholarship is currently the only one offered by a water utility among the 15 active scholarships. The 2013 American Water Scholarship was announced at the organization's ACE13 event in Denver. For more information about AWWA scholarships, visit http://www.awwa.org/membership/get-involved/student-center/awwa-scholarships.aspx.

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