Water treatment technologies sought to remedy global water scarcity

Sponsored by

July 25, 2013 -- A new article in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News discusses the topic of coping with a global water crisis that already has left almost 800 million people without access to drinkable water -- and could engulf many more in the years ahead.

Alex Scott, C&EN's senior editor for Europe, points out that most companies involved in water treatment technologies focus on providing services in wealthy industrialized nations. But today's most critical shortage of clean water is impacting impoverished areas of sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia and other poor regions that can't afford to build or sustain large-scale water purification plants. Companies that provide water purification technology find it difficult to channel R&D cash toward small-scale, inexpensive water treatment devices that won't recoup their investment, let alone turn a profit.

The article describes innovative solutions that nevertheless are emerging. Nonprofit organizations and chemical companies, for instance, have developed and started distributing a handful of appropriate technologies. These range from simple boreholes to straws with built-in filtration systems. The technology is reaching people in rural villages around the world. Many individuals have benefited from these new technologies, which can be life-saving, but millions more are still in need, the story points out.

C&EN is the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

Research reveals dramatic growth of global hydropower expected this decade

Based on new statistics, an unprecedented boom in global hydropower dam construction is underway, primarily in developing countries and emerging economies.

DOD, NIH awards Cambrian prestigious contracts to further develop advanced biotechnologies

Cambrian Innovation recently won a prestigious contract from the Department of Defense and another two from the National Institutes of Health to further develop biotechnologies to dramatically improve water treatment, testing and remediation.

MWH Global promotes nearly a dozen employees to VP positions

MWH Global has officially announced the promotion of three employees to senior vice president and eight others to vice president. The promotions were confirmed by the MWH board of directors at its August board meeting.

Online Zeta Potential Measurement Provides Water Treatment Control, Cost Reduction

Online zeta potential measurements can provide real-time water quality monitoring and support effective process control under all circumstances. The value of online measurement is illustrated through the experiences of Aurora Water, which is using zeta potential at one facility as both an offline and online tool for monitoring and controlling water treatment processes.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA