WERF seeks to recover carbon-based benefits from wastewater byproducts

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ALEXANDRIA, VA, August 1, 2013 -- The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) is seeking proposals to identify and provide a comprehensive list of existing and emerging technologies that can realistically be used to recover carbon-based commodities from wastewater or wastewater byproducts. The research seeks to include a market analysis of current and estimated future potential market pricing, trends, and demand for these carbon-based commodities. These emerging technologies should be applicable at wastewater treatment plants of various sizes.

WERF is currently funding ongoing research to investigate the recovery of macro-Nutrients (NTRY1R12) and other material commodities such as energy and treated wastewater. WERF previously funded research on biosolids (appropriately treated sewage sludge) as a resource (e.g., nutrient-rich soil amendment). This research builds upon the prior and ongoing research by focusing on other commodities or products and the technologies that produce them.

Several carbon based materials are present in domestic wastewater and perhaps biosolids. However, the value and demand for these products is unknown. Many scientific papers have been published on the availability of these products in wastewater. The industry, however, needs to get an objective and unbiased view of the value and current and future demand for these products. This research project seeks to provide that unbiased view.

Proposers are strongly encouraged to seek additional partners, collaborators, test sites, case studies, etc. to further leverage the level of effort and funding, as well as to successfully complete the research. Additional in-cash and in-kind contributions, for example, through technology providers, wastewater plants, personnel, and laboratories are also encouraged.

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