U.S. lawmakers introduce Water Protection, Reinvestment Trust Fund Act

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WASHINGTON, DC, Nov. 21, 2013 -- Today, members of the United States House of Representatives introduced the Water Protection and Reinvestment Trust Fund Act of 2013.

The bipartisan bill would provide a small, deficit-neutral, protected source of revenue to help states replace, repair and rehabilitate critical wastewater treatment facilities by creating a voluntary labeling and contributory system to which businesses that rely on a clean water source could opt-in.

Representative Earl Blumenauer (OR-03) along with Representatives Tim Bishop (NY-01), John Duncan (TN-02), Donna F. Edwards (MD-04) Richard Hanna (NY-22), Jim Moran (VA-08), Tom Petri (WI-06), and Ed Whitfield (KY-01) introduced the bill.

While it would take over $9.3 billion a year to maintain a clean-water infrastructure, funding has averaged just over $1.25 billion a year since 2000. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) has given U.S. wastewater infrastructure a grade of "D" in their most recent report card. Last year alone, American communities suffered more than 310,000 water main breaks and saw overflowing combined sewer systems, causing contamination, property damage, disruptions in the water supply, and massive traffic jams.

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Aeration Problem?

A supposed aeration problem is often nothing of the sort; it is simply the need for an efficient and appropriate mixer. Therefore, any facility striving to achieve as much treatment as possible on-site should consider mixing to reduce total operation costs.

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