Water quality in DE state to improve with new wastewater system regulations

Sponsored by


DOVER, DE, Jan. 7, 2014 -- The state of Delaware's revised wastewater system regulations will be effective on Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014, and will keep pace with changes in technology for large and small systems, protect public health and reduce pollution in groundwater, streams, rivers, and bays, to help meet its goal of achieving clean water.

The changes correspond to regulations in effect for the past four years in Delaware's Inland Bays watershed. Currently almost all of Delaware's rivers and streams are impaired and considered unswimmable or unhealthy due to excess nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus entering local waterways.

The new regulations also protect homebuyers from acquiring malfunctioning septic systems. DNREC's Division of Water estimates that approximately 18 percent of the state's 70,000 septic systems may be malfunctioning. Failing septic systems are sources of groundwater contamination, making it important to replace older, malfunctioning systems to prevent potential health hazards and improve water quality.

The regulatory changes represent the culmination of more than five years of work by DNREC staff that included 13 workshops and three public hearings, answering questions and gathering input from homeowners, state legislators, realtors, businesses, the wastewater industry, and public utilities. After each workshop and hearing, the draft regulations were amended to reflect public comment.

The revised regulations include requirements for small residential septic systems of less than 2,500 gallons of wastewater treated per day, as well as large community and commercial systems of more than 2,500 gallons of wastewater treated per day. Several sections of the regulations include phase-in effective dates. Click here for a list of specific regulations going into effect.

###

 

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

City of Lima, Ohio, enters CWA settlement to reduce critical sewage overflows

To resolve claims that untreated sewer discharges were released into the Ottawa River during wet weather, the city of Lima, Ohio, has entered into a Clean Water Act settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Justice and State of Ohio.

AWWA to Congress: Nutrient pollution reduction key to preventing cyanotoxins

In a testimony recently held before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy, American Water Works Association President John Donahue stressed that the solution to keeping drinking water safe from cyanotoxins begins with reducing nutrient pollution.

Reclamation invests $9.2M in water, power research in West amid drought

Following a year of record drought, water managers throughout the West are searching for information and ideas to ensure a reliable and sustainable water supply. To meet this growing need, the Bureau of Reclamation has officially awarded $9.2 million for 131 research projects.

City of Philadelphia names first 'Stormwater Pioneer'

The Philadelphia Water Department has named Stanley's True Value Hardware as the city's first Stormwater Pioneer. The store's third-generation owners were recognized as role models for small business owners and private developers looking to reduce stormwater runoff.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA