Mobile pilot ozone system aims to remove wastewater pharmaceutical residue

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Jan. 17, 2014 -- Funding has recently been provided to Primozone, a Swedish ozone generator supplier, to build a mobile pilot scale ozone system for the removal of pharmaceutical residue.

The project has been funded by Tillväxtverket, the Swedish agency for economical and regional growth, with the goal of proving the concept on existing wastewater treatment plants, as well as testing and confirming the system design on different water flows and environmental conditions. This endeavor is underway given that existing wastewater treatment plants are not equipped to remove pharmaceutical residue.

The presence of pharmaceutical residue in wastewater has been a prevalent issue for more than a decade, and numerous studies have been conducted to determine its influence on the environment. As such, many countries in Europe are taking necessary political action to reduce its effects despite the advent of the technology. One example is taking place in Switzerland, where a political decision will equip about 100 sewage plants with the residue-removing systems.

Pharmaceutical residue is also often difficult to break down, as it is stable by nature. Ozone, however, is an effective solution because it serves as a selective oxidant that primarily attacks electron-rich structures in molecules, such as double bonds. Ozone is also the most sustainable technology both in terms of economy and environmental friendliness.

"Removal of pharmaceutical residue with ozone can be done at a surprisingly low cost per m3 water treated," said Anders Schening, CEO of Primozone. "Unlike other technologies, ozone treatment leaves no residue or byproducts that need further treatment -- ozone is produced by oxygen and will revert to oxygen again after it has reacted."

About Primozone

Primozone is a supplier of patented innovative ozone generators that generate large amounts of ozone using low amount of energy. The products are highly-efficient, energy-efficient, reliable, easy to install and maintain, light and with a small footprint, quiet, and with a built-in flexible monitoring and control system, giving the customers more efficient and reliable water treatment, reduced operating costs and the lowest life cycle cost on the market by far. For more information, visit www.primozone.com.

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