Researchers aiming to improve water quality receive nearly $9M in EPA grants

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WASHINGTON, DC, Feb. 17, 2014 -- On Thursday, Jan. 30, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy announced grants to four U.S. research institutions for innovative and sustainable water research to manage harmful nutrient pollution.

Announced at the 14th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment, these grants support sustainable water research and demonstration projects consistent with a comprehensive strategy for managing nutrients and active community engagement throughout the research process.

The Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants, for example, are an integral part of EPA's research on water quality and availability. Improving existing water infrastructure is costly, which makes creating new and sustainable approaches to water use, reuse and nutrient management important.

"These grants will go towards research to help us better manage nutrients and better protect our precious water resources from the dangers of nutrient pollution, especially in a changing climate," said McCarthy.

Nutrient pollution is one of America's most widespread, costly and challenging environmental problems and is caused by excess nitrogen and phosphorus in waterways. It has impacted many streams, rivers, lakes, bays, and coastal waters for the past several decades, resulting in elevated toxins and bacterial growth in the environment that can negatively impact public health and the economy. 

The following institutions received grants:

Pennsylvania State University Center for Integrated Multi-scale Nutrient Pollution Solutions -- to focus on nutrient flows in Pennsylvania and the Chesapeake basin

University of South Florida Center for Reinventing Aging Infrastructure for Nutrient Management -- to support Tampa Bay and similar coastal areas as they face problems of aging wastewater collection and treatment systems and rapid population growth

Colorado State University, Center for Comprehensive, Optimal, and Effective Abatement of Nutrients -- for linking physical, biological, legal, social, and economic aspects of nutrient management in the Western and Eastern United States

Water Environment Research Foundation, Alexandria, Va., National Center for Resource Recovery and Nutrient Management -- for innovative research in nutrient reduction through resource recovery and behavioral factors affecting acceptance and implementation

See also:

"Over half of U.S. waterways in poor condition, finds EPA survey"

"Online water resources tool sheds light on U.S. waterway condition"

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