Researchers aiming to improve water quality receive nearly $9M in EPA grants

Sponsored by


WASHINGTON, DC, Feb. 17, 2014 -- On Thursday, Jan. 30, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy announced grants to four U.S. research institutions for innovative and sustainable water research to manage harmful nutrient pollution.

Announced at the 14th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment, these grants support sustainable water research and demonstration projects consistent with a comprehensive strategy for managing nutrients and active community engagement throughout the research process.

The Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants, for example, are an integral part of EPA's research on water quality and availability. Improving existing water infrastructure is costly, which makes creating new and sustainable approaches to water use, reuse and nutrient management important.

"These grants will go towards research to help us better manage nutrients and better protect our precious water resources from the dangers of nutrient pollution, especially in a changing climate," said McCarthy.

Nutrient pollution is one of America's most widespread, costly and challenging environmental problems and is caused by excess nitrogen and phosphorus in waterways. It has impacted many streams, rivers, lakes, bays, and coastal waters for the past several decades, resulting in elevated toxins and bacterial growth in the environment that can negatively impact public health and the economy. 

The following institutions received grants:

Pennsylvania State University Center for Integrated Multi-scale Nutrient Pollution Solutions -- to focus on nutrient flows in Pennsylvania and the Chesapeake basin

University of South Florida Center for Reinventing Aging Infrastructure for Nutrient Management -- to support Tampa Bay and similar coastal areas as they face problems of aging wastewater collection and treatment systems and rapid population growth

Colorado State University, Center for Comprehensive, Optimal, and Effective Abatement of Nutrients -- for linking physical, biological, legal, social, and economic aspects of nutrient management in the Western and Eastern United States

Water Environment Research Foundation, Alexandria, Va., National Center for Resource Recovery and Nutrient Management -- for innovative research in nutrient reduction through resource recovery and behavioral factors affecting acceptance and implementation

See also:

"Over half of U.S. waterways in poor condition, finds EPA survey"

"Online water resources tool sheds light on U.S. waterway condition"

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

CSSD expands performance standard to address treatment of shale wastewater

The Center for Sustainable Shale Development announced that it has expanded its wastewater Performance Standard 1 to address the treatment of shale wastewater at permitted facilities.

Water Council announces Round III of The Brew accelerator program

The BREW, a first-of-its-kind place-based global seed accelerator for water technology startups led by The Water Council, has announced that it is launching Round III of the program.  

Siemens to supply turbines for MI combined-cycled power plant project

Siemens has announced that it is supplying two gas turbines and one steam turbine for the Holland Energy Park combined-cycle power plant, to be constructed in the city of Holland, Mich.

CA city deploys smart water software for improved decision support, capital planning

In an effort to prioritize main replacement, coordinate outage response, pinpoint capacity deficiencies, and identify optimal flushing locations in the city of Santa Ana, Calif., the Santa Ana Public Works Agency is adopting Sedaru smart water enterprise software from IDModeling, Inc.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA