Researchers aiming to improve water quality receive nearly $9M in EPA grants

Sponsored by


WASHINGTON, DC, Feb. 17, 2014 -- On Thursday, Jan. 30, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy announced grants to four U.S. research institutions for innovative and sustainable water research to manage harmful nutrient pollution.

Announced at the 14th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment, these grants support sustainable water research and demonstration projects consistent with a comprehensive strategy for managing nutrients and active community engagement throughout the research process.

The Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants, for example, are an integral part of EPA's research on water quality and availability. Improving existing water infrastructure is costly, which makes creating new and sustainable approaches to water use, reuse and nutrient management important.

"These grants will go towards research to help us better manage nutrients and better protect our precious water resources from the dangers of nutrient pollution, especially in a changing climate," said McCarthy.

Nutrient pollution is one of America's most widespread, costly and challenging environmental problems and is caused by excess nitrogen and phosphorus in waterways. It has impacted many streams, rivers, lakes, bays, and coastal waters for the past several decades, resulting in elevated toxins and bacterial growth in the environment that can negatively impact public health and the economy. 

The following institutions received grants:

Pennsylvania State University Center for Integrated Multi-scale Nutrient Pollution Solutions -- to focus on nutrient flows in Pennsylvania and the Chesapeake basin

University of South Florida Center for Reinventing Aging Infrastructure for Nutrient Management -- to support Tampa Bay and similar coastal areas as they face problems of aging wastewater collection and treatment systems and rapid population growth

Colorado State University, Center for Comprehensive, Optimal, and Effective Abatement of Nutrients -- for linking physical, biological, legal, social, and economic aspects of nutrient management in the Western and Eastern United States

Water Environment Research Foundation, Alexandria, Va., National Center for Resource Recovery and Nutrient Management -- for innovative research in nutrient reduction through resource recovery and behavioral factors affecting acceptance and implementation

See also:

"Over half of U.S. waterways in poor condition, finds EPA survey"

"Online water resources tool sheds light on U.S. waterway condition"

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

Oil sands tailings reclamation to be improved with novel solar energy-driven process

University of Alberta civil engineering professors have developed a novel technique that uses solar energy to accelerate tailings pond reclamation efforts by industry, ultimately helping to make the cleanup process of oil sands tailings more environmentally friendly.

MWH to support implementation of capital improvement plan for FL county

The Palm Beach County Water Utilities Department of Florida has awarded a contract to MWH Global to assist in delivery of the company's 2015-2020 capital improvement plan as owner's advisor.

Nutrient recovery facility in Canada to be scaled up

EPCOR Water Services and Ostara Nutrient Recovery Technologies have partnered to scale up one of the first nutrient recovery facilities in Canada...

Innovative carbon-neutral wastewater treatment plant unveiled in California

The EPA recently joined the Bureau of Reclamation, California Energy Commission and Congressman Col. Paul Cook at the ceremonial start of Victor Valley Wastewater Reclamation Authority's carbon-neutral energy project located at ITS wastewater treatment facility in Victorville, Calif.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA