Planned Texas polyaluminum chloride plant to address clean water practices

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AMBLER, PA, March 3, 2014 -- Today, GEO Specialty Chemicals, Inc. (GEO) announced plans for a large expansion of its Water Treatment Chemicals Division on the site of an existing GEO facility in Deer Park, Texas.

The new facility will produce polyaluminum chloride (PAC) products to serve municipalities in need of improved and cost-effective solutions in clean water practices. The proven benefits of PAC are reducing overall water treatment costs and effectively removing the water turbidity, color, heavy metals, and trace organic compounds such as caustic corrosion and lime.

The expansion, set to be completed in late 2014, is designed specifically to manufacture aluminum-based coagulants for water treatment solutions and will be constructed on a 108-acre site that also manufactures GEO's Glycine product line. "Results from jar tests, trials and full product implementation at multiple sites located throughout Texas are extremely promising," said Scot Lang, GEO's Senior Vice President for the Water Treatment Chemicals Division.

The new Deer Park location will be the second GEO site to make the new highly-active PAC products; the other is located in Chattanooga, Tenn. Currently, GEO owns and operates 15 water treatment centers throughout the southeast United States and has assisted thousands of municipal water treatment systems in North America.

Locations of GEO Water Treatment Centers (Photo credit: GEO)

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