Water, wastewater contracts awarded to DSI subsidiary in Romania, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Turkey

Sponsored by

Water, wastewater contracts awarded to DSI subsidiary in Romania, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Turkey

 

Three major projects for water and wastewater treatment plants in Romania, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Turkey for a combined value of EUR 33.4 million have been awarded to Passavant-Roediger GmbH, a wholly owned German subsidiary of Drake & Scull International (DSI).

Under the terms of the Romanian agreement, Passavant-Roediger will undertake the execution of the civil, mechanical, electrical and SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) works.

This is as well as testing and commissioning for the rehabilitation and extension of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in the cities of Sinaia and Breaza and drinking water treatment plants in Comarnic and Sinaia.

The work is expected to be completed by 2015 and the company is also currently delivering wastewater Treatment Plants in the Romanian cities of Campina and Plopeni.

Passavant’s scope of work in Bosnia and Herzegovina will involve the rehabilitation of the Sarajevo wastewater treatment plant at Butila to increase its capacity to 170, 000 m3/day of wastewater per day to serve a population equivalent of 600,000.

Passavant-Roediger will process the design, undertake detailed engineering work, and procure mechanical, electrical, and automation equipments. Work on the project is expected to be completed by 2016.

As part of the contract, the company will construct an activated sludge plant with primary clarifiers, biological nitrification/denitrification and biological/chemical phosphorous removal and anaerobic stabilization of sludge in sludge digesters to treat 32,000 m3/day to serve a population equivalent of 185,000.

It was in 2009 when DSI acquired Passavant-Roediger in 2009 to enhance its capabilities in the region’s water and wastewater sector.

###

Read more

Sludge chemical market in Europe set to nearly double                                                                                                    Rising industrial wastewater volume and, hence, sludge amounts are creating a flood of opportunities for industrial sludge treatment chemicals manufacturers in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE)…

Romania steps up to the Water Framework Directive                                                                                                                Romania is facing Water Framework Directive challenges and two thirds of the rural population still lack access to a centralised water supply system. Dr Vasile Ciomos, president of the country's water association speaks to Jeremy Josephs about opportunities for international water companies and improving non-revenue water…

Sponsored by

RELATED PRODUCTS

TODAY'S HEADLINES

Clearing Things Up at Prequannock WTP

In 2010, the city of Newark, N.J., retained Hatch Mott MacDonald to investigate potential solutions to a problem at Pequannock WTP. Decant tanks were providing minimal solids removal as a result of removed tube settlers from deterioration. Inclined plate settlers were identified as a feasible alternative for improving supernatant water quality and were selected for pilot testing.

Be the Change: Embracing New Approaches to Foster Innovation in the Water Industry

The pressure to accommodate change will drive our traditionally risk-averse industry to embrace new and different approaches at an accelerated pace. Further, the demand for a zero-energy footprint will also drive improvements in co-generation efficiencies, energy conservation and recovery methods, and comprehensive resource recovery.

CDC preparing Ebola guidance for wastewater treatment personnel

In a recent conference call with AWWA and other major water organizations, the CDC shared it has prepared and is conducting an expedited internal review of an interim guidance on wastewater worker safety and the inactivation of the Ebola virus by wastewater treatment processes.

New partnership to measure farmers' conservation impacts on U.S. water quality

The U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Department of Agriculture have announced a new partnership that will provide a clearer picture of the benefits of farmers' conservation practices on the quality of the nation's waters. 

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA