Potable water quality to be improved in NM city with significant water system upgrades

Sponsored by


ANTHONY, NEW MEXICO, Feb. 27, 2014 -- Significant water system improvements intended to provide a reliable and sustainable water supply for the city of Anthony, N.M., were recently completed, and a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held today to commemorate the project.

The renovations, sponsored by the Anthony Water and Sanitation District (AWSD), included the construction of two water wells with a combined capacity of 1,700 gallons per minute (gpm), as well as the installation of new pump equipment in two other water wells, a reverse osmosis (RO) unit with a capacity of 600 gpm, and more than 14,900 feet of PVC waterlines.

These improvements will reduce arsenic concentrations to acceptable levels in compliance with current federal regulations, thus protecting the health of the local population. In addition, AWSD will be able to tactically draw water from all wells, lessening the local burden on the aquifer.

The $8.8-million project received a $2.8-million grant from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) through the Border Environment Infrastructure Fund (BEIF), which is administered by the North American Development Bank (NADB). Further, the Border Environment Cooperation Commission (BECC) certified the project in May 2011 and provided a $261,000 grant through its Project Development Assistance Program (PDAP) for project design and engineering.

The project was designed by the firm Molzen Corbin with offices in Las Cruces and Albuquerque, N.M. Phase-1 construction was completed by Henkle Drilling, Phase-2 construction was carried out by Burn Construction, and Phase-3 was performed by Smithco Construction.

"This project is improving the quality of life of local residents by reducing the risks associated with arsenic consumption. With the completion of this project, residents now have access to safe drinking water and a water system that will meet the future needs of this community," said Maria Elena Giner, BECC General Manager. "Without the construction of the new wells, the existing wells would have continued to be stressed."

See also: "Evidence on Arsenic Confirms Drinking Water Risks"

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

City of Lima, Ohio, enters CWA settlement to reduce critical sewage overflows

To resolve claims that untreated sewer discharges were released into the Ottawa River during wet weather, the city of Lima, Ohio, has entered into a Clean Water Act settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Justice and State of Ohio.

AWWA to Congress: Nutrient pollution reduction key to preventing cyanotoxins

In a testimony recently held before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy, American Water Works Association President John Donahue stressed that the solution to keeping drinking water safe from cyanotoxins begins with reducing nutrient pollution.

Reclamation invests $9.2M in water, power research in West amid drought

Following a year of record drought, water managers throughout the West are searching for information and ideas to ensure a reliable and sustainable water supply. To meet this growing need, the Bureau of Reclamation has officially awarded $9.2 million for 131 research projects.

City of Philadelphia names first 'Stormwater Pioneer'

The Philadelphia Water Department has named Stanley's True Value Hardware as the city's first Stormwater Pioneer. The store's third-generation owners were recognized as role models for small business owners and private developers looking to reduce stormwater runoff.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA