UV disinfection energy consumption cut by 30 percent with new technology

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SCHAFFHAUSEN, SWITZERLAND, Feb. 3, 2014 -- A new technology that can reduce the energy consumption of an ultraviolet (UV) disinfection system by up to 30 percent* has been introduced to the water and wastewater industry.

The performance-enhancing Wedeco Ecoray Upgrade Kits from Xylem Inc. (NYSE: XYL), a global water technology company focused on addressing the world's most challenging water issues, combine the capabilities of UV disinfection with the latest in high-performance technology to ensure the optimum operation of a facility using a minimum amount of energy.

The kits incorporate next-generation, energy-efficient UV lamps with ballasts, which are enabled to consistently perform at their very best for over 14,000 hours**. Further, Wedeco UVC sensors guarantee accurate UV measurements and support the ballasts and lamps' optimum operation while preventing energy wastage. Wipers and brushes also keep the sleeves and sensors free from dirt and capable of peak performance. 

* This statistic is based on a comparative study between Ecoray lamps ELR30 with Wedeco Spektrotherm (SL32143 4p HP).
**
Attested by the Chamber of Industry and Commerce of Karlsruhe, Germany, as an authorised inspector for UV radiation technology

About Xylem

Xylem (NYSE: XYL) is a leading global water technology provider, enabling customers to transport, treat, test and efficiently use water in public utility, residential and commercial building services, industrial and agricultural settings. The company does business in more than 150 countries through a number of market-leading product brands, and its people bring broad applications expertise with a strong focus on finding local solutions to the world’s most challenging water and wastewater problems. For more information, visit www.xyleminc.com.

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