EPA issues Validation of Technology and Products for onsite water-sensing technology

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CHAMPAIGN, IL, April 1, 2014 -- A new water-sensing technology from ANDalyze has completed testing by the Environmental Protection Agency for use in drinking water and environmental water. Further, ANDalyze has completed the application, protocol development, and testing phases required by the Agency's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program.

The product, DNAzyme, is a system of hand-held fluorimeter and consumable sensors that test for heavy-metal concentrations in water, which provides results in less than one minute. The system currently tests for lead, copper, uranium, mercury, zinc, and cadmium. Measuring metal ions is done through a reaction occurring when a water sample containing a target metal ion contaminant (e.g. lead) is introduced to an analyte-specific DNAzyme sensor.

Accordingly, the test is performed by injecting a water sample through the sensor housing and into a portable fluorimeter. The sample will fluoresce in direct correlation to the amount of metal ion present in the sample. Results are given in parts per billion (PPB) in less than 60 seconds. This method greatly reduces time and effort as compared with older technologies. This advantage creates a cost savings for organizations responsible for water testing of public drinking water supplies, environmental water sources or industrial water operations.

The results of these tests are a publically-available, third-party testing report that notes the usefulness of the technology and products. The full report (150 pgs.) of the ANDalyze Test Kit and Fluorimeter is available here, whereas a summary of the report is available here. Further, a video explaining how the product works is available here. A variety of new sensors are planned for the coming months.

See also: "White Paper: Heavy Metals Water Testing - Powered by DNA"

About ANDalyze Inc.

ANDalyze offers products for testing water contamination using catalytic DNA technologies. The company developed methodology for detecting and quantifying chemical levels based on the recent discovery of the catalytic properties of DNA. This technology and product is a universal platform that offers simple, fast, inexpensive and reliable detection of trace metals and other target chemicals. For more information, visit www.andalyze.com.

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